Frank Under Fire—How a WordPress Theme Designed for Speed Performed Under High Traffic Conditions

I wrote an article for Smashing Magazine a few weeks ago showcasing Frank. As was expected, my site got bombed. Since Frank was designed from the ground up to be fast, I wanted to share the results of how Frank performed on a high volume traffic day. It’s important to know that my site is hosted on a medium-tier VPS with no CDN. Read On…

The Status Update Needs an Open Standard

Twitter’s recent API shenanigans have been exhaustively documented. Like it or not, Twitter is making a business decision and there is little that anyone can do about it. App.net has made a play to provide a clear alternative. Full disclosure, I am a paying member of App.net. I think they are providing a valuable service and I am pulling for them to succeed. With that said, I do not think App.net (or any closed service) is the solution to the problem. Read On…

SVG CSS Injection—A Different Approach Towards SVG Rendering

Retina displays are going to drastically change how we design for the web. Vector imagery, most notably SVG, will become a significant tool to display resolution-independent imagery at a reasonable bandwidth footprint. I made the switch to SVG on my site using data URIs a few weeks back and will not be looking back. One thing has gnawed at me when I added the SVGs to my CSS file. It felt wrong to treat those SVGs like a plain images. One considerable strength to SVG is that it’s markup-based. That nagging feeling led me to experiment with a different approach to rendering vector imagery on a website, which I am calling SVG CSS injection. Read On…

Our Ideas Are Cheap Because We Treat Them Cheaply

I have 30 minutes to write this post. I normally do not write posts in 30 minutes. It usually takes me a long time to write on my blog because I want to make it as polished as possible out of the chute. I feel this way because I know once the content is posted, it will get a decent amount of readership the day I publish with an exponential drop-off from that point forward. No one (figuratively) will read an update on my post, so the incentive to improve or build upon past blog posts is non-existent.
Read On…

Where Icons Are Headed on the Web

Oak Studios just released Symbolset, an icon set that creates a significant step forward in a long-running trend for iconography on the web. In their words, Symbolsets are “semantic symbol fonts”, which act as replacements for full words in your HTML. This has a clear advantage for accessibility and indexing. Symbolset uses font files as the delivery system and map the icons to standard Unicode values. Read On…